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French Toast Santa Fe

Hot, crunchy, syrupy, sugary eggy bread.  Oh yes!  Let the three days of spinster self indulgence begin!

There is more than meets the eye to this food photography business.   This week’s course assignment is all about styling and props.  I wanted to take a picture that included the cup and saucer that my Shellac Sister Jane kindly gave me to go with these plates.  It was tricky.  Here is the best of the bunch.  I’m sure my chum Alastair Hendy would have something to say about the bubbles in the coffee…  I didn’t see them while I was snapping away…

Trouble was, the smell of the French Toast was so GOOD I had to stop mucking around with the camera and eat it while it was hot so I don’t think any of the pix are good enough for appraisal by the tutor.  I’ll have to make something else scrumptious.

I might offer a prize to anyone who guesses what ridiculous “prop” I have placed next to the coffee cup.

Recipe from: A Treasury of Great Recipes.  The Santa Fe of the title was the Sante Fe Super Chief train.  Vincent said that he and Mary had the greatest breakfasts that either of them could remember in the dining car of this legendary mode of transport.  According to Wikipedia: t was often referred to as “The Train of the Stars” because of the many celebrities who traveled on the streamliner between Chicago and Los Angeles.  I really want to get hold of a Gloria Swanson film called Three for Bedroom “C” which was all shot aboard the Santa Fe Super Chief.

I love the way Vincent writes about the room where he and Mary often entertained guests for breakfast – their library – “filled with fun things” including a coffin bench converted into a coffee table.  He says, “Breakfast in this cheerful room gives even the hardest, longest day a bright send-off.  And a breakfast that is made from any of the recipes in the following section is guaranteed to do the same for you.”  Yippee!  I was thinking this might be a hard, long day but now I’ve had my eggy bread I can breeze into it like the Santa Fe rolling through the colourful Western landscape!

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About Jenny Hammerton

I am a film archivist living in London, making film star fodder and writing about movie stars and their recipes in my spare time. My main website is at www.silverscreensuppers.com - over there I record my attempts to cook the favourite dishes of the greatest film stars of Hollywood's Golden Era - 10 years of nonsense and counting!

3 responses to “French Toast Santa Fe

  1. P.S. There is a menu for the Santa Fe Dining Car in the Treasury. In the mid 60s French Toast was 1 dollar. I think if I’d been hanging out with the stars I probably would have selected one of the entrees though as I love a savoury breakfast. Choices were Kippered Herring on Toast, with or without Scrambled Eggs, Calf’s Liver Saute with Rasher of Bacon, Grilled French Lamb Chop au Cresson, Browned Corned Beef Hash, with or without a Poached Egg. Even though I have barely digested the French Toast, I am salivating over the idea of Browned Corned Beef Hash with a Poached Egg.

  2. Hooray for French toast! It’s definitely one of my guilty pleasures. My dad used to make it a lot for breakfast on the weekends (usually alternating pancakes, waffles and French toast).

    I think photography for a food blog is difficult because of the whole temperature thing. I never want to sacrifice a hot meal for a perfect photo…

  3. You are so right Lauren! Your photos are always great. I am such a beginner. I am learning so much as I go along. It’s fun experimenting and I look at some of the pictures I took when I first started with pure horror!

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